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Carroll County Historical Museum – Carroll, Iowa — Iowa Tourism

Carroll County Historical Museum – Carroll, Iowa

Carrol County HistoricalCarroll County Historical Museum – Carroll, Iowa hosting historical items from each community in Carroll County. The museum is located in the former Carnegie Library.

If you have an interest in the history of the communities in Carroll County the museum should be a stop in your travels. The museum has records available on the early communities and displays of historical items used by the farmers and business people of the area.

Location: 123 E 6th St.

Phone: 712-792-9548

Hours: 10 – 4 Tures – Fri, 1 -4 Sunday May – Auguest. 1 – 4 Tue., Fri., and first Sunday of month Sept. – April.

Motorcoach parking is available

Admission: None  

Location: Carroll, Iowa 51401

 

Comments

  1. Aliene Wolfington says:

    Friend has client by name of Esther (last name not remembered), approx 94 years old. She and family worked at Earle Theater in Carroll, Iowa. Friend wishes to obtain picture of theater to present to client. Also history of theater and what happened to it could be helpful.

  2. Larry Cover says:

    I have fond memories of when I was a young boy in the later 40′s & early 50′s of the old State Theatre in Carroll which was located on the block near the Carroll Candy Kitchen. Could this be the same movie house as the Earle Theatre? I came in possession of an old upright telephone with the date 1903 on the bottom that came from the old State Theatre after it was shut down and I later worked at the Carroll Theatre as a ticket taker, marque sign changer as well as duties at te Carroll Drive in Theatre east of Carroll on Hwy 30. I worked for Bill Arts for several years. The Carroll Theatre was later opened across from the Carroll Courthouse which set high on a high over looking the town square the bowling alley, Fire Station & Police Station with Nockels C;lothier & a cafe on the corner to the west.

    I seem to have a slight memory of a couple that worked at the State Theatre, as ticket seller and he did everthing else. I remember my parents giving me 25 cents to go to the movie. It cost 10 cents for the ticket, a nickel for a candy bar and 10 cents for popcorn. Quite a
    change from today’s cost of movie going.

    I seem to remember that the couple lived across the street from the Safeway store near the TopHat Bar. There was a lot of kids in the family that all went to Kuemper High School but for the life of me I can’t recall there last name.

    I hope I’m thinking of the right people that you seek information on but can’t be sure.

    Good luck in your search !!

  3. As the comments above are not dated, I don’t know how long ago Aliene Wolfington asked her question, but I do have an answer, however belated. Unfortunately I’ve not been able to track down a picture of the Earle Theatre. The Earle Theatre was in operation by 1925, when Minneapolis architectural firm Liebenberg & Kaplan did some work on it. This might have been the original construction date, or it might have been a remodeling of an existing theater. The same firm did more work on the theater in 1936.

    The Earle Theatre was destroyed by a fire in October, 1945, and was replaced by the new Carroll Theatre which opened in May, 1946. I’ve been unable to discover if the Carroll Theatre was on the same site as the Earle Theatre or not. The Carroll Theatre itself is also gone, demolished in 1973 to make way for the Carroll Civic Center. It was at 220 E. Fifth Street. A two-screen movie house also called the Carroll Theatre opened the next year on Main Street, and has since been expanded to five screens.

    Larry Cover: The State was not the same theater as the Earle. As near as I’ve been able to determine, it was called the Royal Theatre before being remodeled and renamed the State in 1936. It seems to have been closed sometime in the early-to-mid 1950s, but I’ve not found the exact year. Many small theaters were closed around 1954-1955 because the operators couldn’t afford to convert them to the new wide-screen processes that were replacing standard-screen movies. The State was quite likely one of these.

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